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WMWomensAid check out our just giving page raising money to furnish our new Hereford refuge https://t.co/GJ2h0Krb4h
Aug 23replyretweet
WMWomensAid Our new refuge in Hereford is ahead of schedule! It will open in the late summer, 2 months earlier than originally planned! #domesticabuse
Jun 28replyretweet
WMWomensAid Up to 60 per cent of women who experience domestic abuse are pregnant at the time #domesticabuse #domesticviolence
Jun 27replyretweet
WMWomensAid We need to furnish our new refuge in Hereford; can you help?
Jun 26replyretweet
WMWomensAid A shocking statistic; the police receive on average more than 100 calls relating to domestic abuse every hour #domesticabuse
Jun 21replyretweet

Today we have the following Refuge vacancies:

Sorry, we have no vacancies

 

The WMWA survivor network is available to all women who have completed their individual recovery pathway or those women who have not experienced domestic abuse for at least 12 months. The network acts as a support group for victims and survivors of domestic abuse. The main aim of this type of group is to strengthen and empower female survivors of abuse.

Many of the benefits of participating in open-Women Group Diversityended, informal self-help groups stem from the emphasis on participants themselves deciding on the direction and organisation of the course and content of the group.

Through social interaction, participation in the decision-making process, and expression of their feelings, ideas, and experiences, the group members stimulate the development of their autonomy, self-esteem, self-confidence and emotional stability. They also gain strength and empowerment through their involvement in the group process itself, and in sharing experiences, ideas and opinions with other survivors.

One of the most important aspects is the group process itself; women are creating a space for themselves to relate to each others as peers, establish strong bonds with one another, and develop supportive relationships based on their shared experiences.

This group dynamic generates an atmosphere of understanding, encouragement and support, which in turn reduces the feelings of loneliness, shame and isolation that so often accompany abusive relationships. Women belonging to self-help groups have identified the following benefits as a result of their participation:

  • Having a space for sharing (both their stories and emotions, and information about resources and/or other services in their community) with others who understand what they have been through;
  • Gaining the companionship and support of other women;
  • Developing the autonomy to address some of their problems or concerns about their life situations
  • Gaining access to the service development and decision making structures of the facilitating organisation
  • Developing skills such as events organising and fundraising
  • Developing valuable and long-lasting friendship networksWoman Thumbs Up

Click here to download the Survivor's Handbook

WHAT OUR SURVIVORS SAY ABOUT US:
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